Alexander Komarov

UBC-Yale Fox Fellow

Areas of Expertise

About

Alexander Komarov is the 2020-2021 Fox International Fellow from Yale University to UBC. His interests span a range of topics in criminal law, including the theory of criminalization, anti-corruption, and philosophy of punishment, as well as the interplay between criminal law, constitutional law and social philosophy.

Alexander holds an LL.M. from Yale Law School, and a Ph.D. and Master of Laws from Yaroslav Mudryi National Law University (Ukraine). He has taught criminal law, anti-corruption and constitutional law courses at Yaroslav Mudryi National Law University and Ukrainian Catholic University.  He also worked with the UNODC to develop and promote anti-corruption and integrity initiatives in education and institutional design. Alexander participated as a designated expert in numerous projects designed to practically reduce corruption in both the judiciary and law enforcement in Ukraine. He contributed his expertise to revising draft legislation on criminal law for the Ukrainian parliament, and he advised judicial and law enforcement agencies on policy matters and the application of the law.

Alexander is a co-founder of The Center for Constitutional Design — an NGO that aims to achieve three goals: 1) make the tenets of constitutional law accessible and attractive to the broader public; 2) bring world-class scholarship on constitutionalism to Ukrainian legal academia and politics; and 3) advocate for comprehensive constitutional reform in Ukraine.

Alexander’s current research project, on Presumption of Guilt: Criminalization of Illicit Enrichment in the Anti-Corruption Efforts of Transitional Societies, seeks to reconcile the public demand for retributive justice in transitional societies suffering from endemic corruption and the fundamental legal principle of presumption of innocence. Under Prof. Joseph Weiler’s guidance, Alexander hopes to build a framework for weighing up ostensibly rigid constitutional principles, such as the presumption of innocence, against variable social impulses, such as the public desire for effective and expedited prosecution of exceptionally insidious or rampant crimes.

Outside of academic work, Alexander loves the outdoors and enjoys hiking, snowboarding and biking.


Alexander Komarov

UBC-Yale Fox Fellow

Alexander Komarov is the 2020-2021 Fox International Fellow from Yale University to UBC. His interests span a range of topics in criminal law, including the theory of criminalization, anti-corruption, and philosophy of punishment, as well as the interplay between criminal law, constitutional law and social philosophy.

Alexander holds an LL.M. from Yale Law School, and a Ph.D. and Master of Laws from Yaroslav Mudryi National Law University (Ukraine). He has taught criminal law, anti-corruption and constitutional law courses at Yaroslav Mudryi National Law University and Ukrainian Catholic University.  He also worked with the UNODC to develop and promote anti-corruption and integrity initiatives in education and institutional design. Alexander participated as a designated expert in numerous projects designed to practically reduce corruption in both the judiciary and law enforcement in Ukraine. He contributed his expertise to revising draft legislation on criminal law for the Ukrainian parliament, and he advised judicial and law enforcement agencies on policy matters and the application of the law.

Alexander is a co-founder of The Center for Constitutional Design — an NGO that aims to achieve three goals: 1) make the tenets of constitutional law accessible and attractive to the broader public; 2) bring world-class scholarship on constitutionalism to Ukrainian legal academia and politics; and 3) advocate for comprehensive constitutional reform in Ukraine.

Alexander’s current research project, on Presumption of Guilt: Criminalization of Illicit Enrichment in the Anti-Corruption Efforts of Transitional Societies, seeks to reconcile the public demand for retributive justice in transitional societies suffering from endemic corruption and the fundamental legal principle of presumption of innocence. Under Prof. Joseph Weiler's guidance, Alexander hopes to build a framework for weighing up ostensibly rigid constitutional principles, such as the presumption of innocence, against variable social impulses, such as the public desire for effective and expedited prosecution of exceptionally insidious or rampant crimes.

Outside of academic work, Alexander loves the outdoors and enjoys hiking, snowboarding and biking.

Alexander Komarov

UBC-Yale Fox Fellow

Alexander Komarov is the 2020-2021 Fox International Fellow from Yale University to UBC. His interests span a range of topics in criminal law, including the theory of criminalization, anti-corruption, and philosophy of punishment, as well as the interplay between criminal law, constitutional law and social philosophy.

Alexander holds an LL.M. from Yale Law School, and a Ph.D. and Master of Laws from Yaroslav Mudryi National Law University (Ukraine). He has taught criminal law, anti-corruption and constitutional law courses at Yaroslav Mudryi National Law University and Ukrainian Catholic University.  He also worked with the UNODC to develop and promote anti-corruption and integrity initiatives in education and institutional design. Alexander participated as a designated expert in numerous projects designed to practically reduce corruption in both the judiciary and law enforcement in Ukraine. He contributed his expertise to revising draft legislation on criminal law for the Ukrainian parliament, and he advised judicial and law enforcement agencies on policy matters and the application of the law.

Alexander is a co-founder of The Center for Constitutional Design — an NGO that aims to achieve three goals: 1) make the tenets of constitutional law accessible and attractive to the broader public; 2) bring world-class scholarship on constitutionalism to Ukrainian legal academia and politics; and 3) advocate for comprehensive constitutional reform in Ukraine.

Alexander’s current research project, on Presumption of Guilt: Criminalization of Illicit Enrichment in the Anti-Corruption Efforts of Transitional Societies, seeks to reconcile the public demand for retributive justice in transitional societies suffering from endemic corruption and the fundamental legal principle of presumption of innocence. Under Prof. Joseph Weiler's guidance, Alexander hopes to build a framework for weighing up ostensibly rigid constitutional principles, such as the presumption of innocence, against variable social impulses, such as the public desire for effective and expedited prosecution of exceptionally insidious or rampant crimes.

Outside of academic work, Alexander loves the outdoors and enjoys hiking, snowboarding and biking.