Elsie Lewison

Postdoctoral Fellow, SPPGA

Research Area

About

Dr. Elsie Lewison is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the School of Public Policy and Global Affairs.

Elsie completed her PhD in Geography at University of Toronto. Her dissertation research examined efforts to develop agricultural markets in Nepal’s agrarian frontiers and their intersection with novel understandings of health and sustainability, place-based struggles for local autonomy and movements for food sovereignty. She is currently developing publications based on this work while pursuing a new comparative research project. This new line of research will explore how the COVID-19 pandemic is re-shaping agricultural governance strategies in the Himalayan region, with particular focus on policies related to organic agriculture and domestic market development. She will also be following similar themes in the British Columbian context as the impacts of the pandemic on the Canadian agricultural sector continue to unfold.

While based at University of Toronto, Elsie also served as the project manager for Infrastructures of Democracy, a seven-year research project led by PI Professor Katharine Rankin (University of Toronto) and Co-I Professor Sara Shneiderman (University of British Columbia). The project is examining processes of post-conflict and post-disaster state building through the lens of rural infrastructure development in Nepal. Elsie continues to work with the Nepal and Canada-based Infrastructures of Democracy team to disseminate findings from the project.

Elsie’s research has been funded by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council, the International Development Research Centre, the Ontario Graduate Scholarship Program, the U.S. Department of Education, and the AAG Geographies of Food and Agriculture Specialty Group.

In addition to her academic work, Elsie also enjoys comics, graphic novels and illustration and is excited to be involved in the production of a series of comics-based infographics related to the Infrastructures of Democracy project.


Publications

Kunwar, S., Rankin, K. & Lewison, E. (forthcoming). Labor and the Humanitarian Present:
Thinking through the 2015 Nepal earthquakes. In Hutt, M., Liechty, M. and Lotter, S., After the Earth’s Violent Sway: The Tangible and Intangible Legacies of a Natural Disaster. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Lewison, E. & Murton, G. (2020). Geographical Scholarship in Nepal: Sustainability, Infrastructure, Disaster and Power. Studies in Nepali History and Society, 25(1),15-58.

Lewison, E., Murton, G., Paudel D. and Rankin, K. (2020). Introduction: Nepal Geographies. Studies in Nepali History and Society, 25(1),15-58.

Lewison, E. (2019). Value chains and development brokers: Engineering inclusive agricultural markets in Jumla, Nepal. South Asia: Journal of Asian Studies, 42(5), 903-919.

Rankin, K., Hamal, P., Lewison E. & Sigdel, T. (2019). Corruption as a diagnostic of power: Navigating the blurred boundaries of the relational state. South Asia: Journal of Asian Studies, 42(5), 920-936.

Rankin, K. & Lewison E. (2018). Corruption in theory and practice: Insights from ethnographic encounters in Nepal. In Grubbauer, M. & Shaw, K. (Eds.), Across Theory and Practice: Thinking Through Urban Research. Berlin: Jovis.

Lewison, E. (2013). Consuming development: Responsibility, citizenship and the corporate university, The Canadian Geographer, 57(3), 363-371.


Elsie Lewison

Postdoctoral Fellow, SPPGA

Dr. Elsie Lewison is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the School of Public Policy and Global Affairs.

Elsie completed her PhD in Geography at University of Toronto. Her dissertation research examined efforts to develop agricultural markets in Nepal’s agrarian frontiers and their intersection with novel understandings of health and sustainability, place-based struggles for local autonomy and movements for food sovereignty. She is currently developing publications based on this work while pursuing a new comparative research project. This new line of research will explore how the COVID-19 pandemic is re-shaping agricultural governance strategies in the Himalayan region, with particular focus on policies related to organic agriculture and domestic market development. She will also be following similar themes in the British Columbian context as the impacts of the pandemic on the Canadian agricultural sector continue to unfold.

While based at University of Toronto, Elsie also served as the project manager for Infrastructures of Democracy, a seven-year research project led by PI Professor Katharine Rankin (University of Toronto) and Co-I Professor Sara Shneiderman (University of British Columbia). The project is examining processes of post-conflict and post-disaster state building through the lens of rural infrastructure development in Nepal. Elsie continues to work with the Nepal and Canada-based Infrastructures of Democracy team to disseminate findings from the project.

Elsie’s research has been funded by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council, the International Development Research Centre, the Ontario Graduate Scholarship Program, the U.S. Department of Education, and the AAG Geographies of Food and Agriculture Specialty Group.

In addition to her academic work, Elsie also enjoys comics, graphic novels and illustration and is excited to be involved in the production of a series of comics-based infographics related to the Infrastructures of Democracy project.

Kunwar, S., Rankin, K. & Lewison, E. (forthcoming). Labor and the Humanitarian Present:
Thinking through the 2015 Nepal earthquakes. In Hutt, M., Liechty, M. and Lotter, S., After the Earth's Violent Sway: The Tangible and Intangible Legacies of a Natural Disaster. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Lewison, E. & Murton, G. (2020). Geographical Scholarship in Nepal: Sustainability, Infrastructure, Disaster and Power. Studies in Nepali History and Society, 25(1),15-58.

Lewison, E., Murton, G., Paudel D. and Rankin, K. (2020). Introduction: Nepal Geographies. Studies in Nepali History and Society, 25(1),15-58.

Lewison, E. (2019). Value chains and development brokers: Engineering inclusive agricultural markets in Jumla, Nepal. South Asia: Journal of Asian Studies, 42(5), 903-919.

Rankin, K., Hamal, P., Lewison E. & Sigdel, T. (2019). Corruption as a diagnostic of power: Navigating the blurred boundaries of the relational state. South Asia: Journal of Asian Studies, 42(5), 920-936.

Rankin, K. & Lewison E. (2018). Corruption in theory and practice: Insights from ethnographic encounters in Nepal. In Grubbauer, M. & Shaw, K. (Eds.), Across Theory and Practice: Thinking Through Urban Research. Berlin: Jovis.

Lewison, E. (2013). Consuming development: Responsibility, citizenship and the corporate university, The Canadian Geographer, 57(3), 363-371.

Elsie Lewison

Postdoctoral Fellow, SPPGA

Dr. Elsie Lewison is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the School of Public Policy and Global Affairs.

Elsie completed her PhD in Geography at University of Toronto. Her dissertation research examined efforts to develop agricultural markets in Nepal’s agrarian frontiers and their intersection with novel understandings of health and sustainability, place-based struggles for local autonomy and movements for food sovereignty. She is currently developing publications based on this work while pursuing a new comparative research project. This new line of research will explore how the COVID-19 pandemic is re-shaping agricultural governance strategies in the Himalayan region, with particular focus on policies related to organic agriculture and domestic market development. She will also be following similar themes in the British Columbian context as the impacts of the pandemic on the Canadian agricultural sector continue to unfold.

While based at University of Toronto, Elsie also served as the project manager for Infrastructures of Democracy, a seven-year research project led by PI Professor Katharine Rankin (University of Toronto) and Co-I Professor Sara Shneiderman (University of British Columbia). The project is examining processes of post-conflict and post-disaster state building through the lens of rural infrastructure development in Nepal. Elsie continues to work with the Nepal and Canada-based Infrastructures of Democracy team to disseminate findings from the project.

Elsie’s research has been funded by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council, the International Development Research Centre, the Ontario Graduate Scholarship Program, the U.S. Department of Education, and the AAG Geographies of Food and Agriculture Specialty Group.

In addition to her academic work, Elsie also enjoys comics, graphic novels and illustration and is excited to be involved in the production of a series of comics-based infographics related to the Infrastructures of Democracy project.

Kunwar, S., Rankin, K. & Lewison, E. (forthcoming). Labor and the Humanitarian Present:
Thinking through the 2015 Nepal earthquakes. In Hutt, M., Liechty, M. and Lotter, S., After the Earth's Violent Sway: The Tangible and Intangible Legacies of a Natural Disaster. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Lewison, E. & Murton, G. (2020). Geographical Scholarship in Nepal: Sustainability, Infrastructure, Disaster and Power. Studies in Nepali History and Society, 25(1),15-58.

Lewison, E., Murton, G., Paudel D. and Rankin, K. (2020). Introduction: Nepal Geographies. Studies in Nepali History and Society, 25(1),15-58.

Lewison, E. (2019). Value chains and development brokers: Engineering inclusive agricultural markets in Jumla, Nepal. South Asia: Journal of Asian Studies, 42(5), 903-919.

Rankin, K., Hamal, P., Lewison E. & Sigdel, T. (2019). Corruption as a diagnostic of power: Navigating the blurred boundaries of the relational state. South Asia: Journal of Asian Studies, 42(5), 920-936.

Rankin, K. & Lewison E. (2018). Corruption in theory and practice: Insights from ethnographic encounters in Nepal. In Grubbauer, M. & Shaw, K. (Eds.), Across Theory and Practice: Thinking Through Urban Research. Berlin: Jovis.

Lewison, E. (2013). Consuming development: Responsibility, citizenship and the corporate university, The Canadian Geographer, 57(3), 363-371.