Douglas Ober

Honorary Research Associate, Centre for India and South Asia Research, IAR

Areas of Expertise

About

Douglas Ober is an Honorary Research Associate with The Centre for India and South Asia Research at the Institute of Asian Research, School of Public Policy and Global Affairs. He specializes in the history of Buddhism in South Asia, especially the modern period (c. 1700 – present). His PhD dissertation focused on the discovery, revival and reinvention of Buddhism in nineteenth and twentieth century India (aspects of this research have been published in Contemporary Buddhism: an interdisciplinary journal and Modern Asian Studies). His broader research interests include the history of colonialism, transnational movements, globalization, ethnicity, caste, Dalit studies and cultural ecology. Since 2003, Douglas has studied, worked and/or conducted research in more than a dozen countries in Asia (but primarily India, Bhutan, Tibet and Myanmar).


Douglas Ober

Honorary Research Associate, Centre for India and South Asia Research, IAR

Douglas Ober is an Honorary Research Associate with The Centre for India and South Asia Research at the Institute of Asian Research, School of Public Policy and Global Affairs. He specializes in the history of Buddhism in South Asia, especially the modern period (c. 1700 – present). His PhD dissertation focused on the discovery, revival and reinvention of Buddhism in nineteenth and twentieth century India (aspects of this research have been published in Contemporary Buddhism: an interdisciplinary journal and Modern Asian Studies). His broader research interests include the history of colonialism, transnational movements, globalization, ethnicity, caste, Dalit studies and cultural ecology. Since 2003, Douglas has studied, worked and/or conducted research in more than a dozen countries in Asia (but primarily India, Bhutan, Tibet and Myanmar).

Douglas Ober

Honorary Research Associate, Centre for India and South Asia Research, IAR

Douglas Ober is an Honorary Research Associate with The Centre for India and South Asia Research at the Institute of Asian Research, School of Public Policy and Global Affairs. He specializes in the history of Buddhism in South Asia, especially the modern period (c. 1700 – present). His PhD dissertation focused on the discovery, revival and reinvention of Buddhism in nineteenth and twentieth century India (aspects of this research have been published in Contemporary Buddhism: an interdisciplinary journal and Modern Asian Studies). His broader research interests include the history of colonialism, transnational movements, globalization, ethnicity, caste, Dalit studies and cultural ecology. Since 2003, Douglas has studied, worked and/or conducted research in more than a dozen countries in Asia (but primarily India, Bhutan, Tibet and Myanmar).