Sara Shneiderman

Associate Professor, SPPGA / Anthropology; Co-Lead, Himalaya Program
location_on C.K. Choi Building-273

Research Area

About

Sara Shneiderman is an Associate Professor in UBC’s School of Public Policy and Global Affairs and the Department of Anthropology. She is Co-Lead of the Himalaya Program. Her research explores how social transformation is shaped by dynamics of citizenship and belonging (in relation to Indigenous, ethnic, religious and gender identities); cross-border mobility; conflict and political mobilization; territory and land use; development discourses and practices; and disaster aftermath and preparedness. In addition to her ongoing research projects, she regularly contributes to policy discussions about development, governance, and politics in Nepal, India, and Tibetan regions of China, and serves as advisor to several NGOs working in the region.

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Sara Shneiderman

Associate Professor, SPPGA / Anthropology; Co-Lead, Himalaya Program
location_on C.K. Choi Building-273

Sara Shneiderman is an Associate Professor in UBC’s School of Public Policy and Global Affairs and the Department of Anthropology. She is Co-Lead of the Himalaya Program. Her research explores how social transformation is shaped by dynamics of citizenship and belonging (in relation to Indigenous, ethnic, religious and gender identities); cross-border mobility; conflict and political mobilization; territory and land use; development discourses and practices; and disaster aftermath and preparedness. In addition to her ongoing research projects, she regularly contributes to policy discussions about development, governance, and politics in Nepal, India, and Tibetan regions of China, and serves as advisor to several NGOs working in the region.

View faculty page >>

 

Sara Shneiderman

Associate Professor, SPPGA / Anthropology; Co-Lead, Himalaya Program
location_on C.K. Choi Building-273

Sara Shneiderman is an Associate Professor in UBC’s School of Public Policy and Global Affairs and the Department of Anthropology. She is Co-Lead of the Himalaya Program. Her research explores how social transformation is shaped by dynamics of citizenship and belonging (in relation to Indigenous, ethnic, religious and gender identities); cross-border mobility; conflict and political mobilization; territory and land use; development discourses and practices; and disaster aftermath and preparedness. In addition to her ongoing research projects, she regularly contributes to policy discussions about development, governance, and politics in Nepal, India, and Tibetan regions of China, and serves as advisor to several NGOs working in the region.

View faculty page >>