Sheryl Lightfoot

Associate Professor, SPPGA / Political Science
phone 604 827 0712
location_on Liu Institute 216B

Research Area

About

Sheryl Lightfoot is Canada Research Chair of Global Indigenous Rights and Politics and Associate Professor, School of Public Policy and Global Affairs and the Department of Political Science at the University of British Columbia.

As one of the world’s experts in global Indigenous politics, Sheryl’s research specializes in complex questions of Indigenous peoples’ rights and how those rights are being claimed and negotiated in various political spaces. Her work explores both practical and theoretical aspects of implementation of Indigenous rights globally as well as in comparative domestic and regional contexts.

Sheryl also currently serves as Senior Advisor to the UBC President on Indigenous Affairs. Sheryl is Anishinaabe from the Lake Superior Band of Ojibwe, enrolled at the Keweenaw Bay Community in northern Michigan.


Research

International Indigenous Rights and Governance Network

Implementing, assessing, and monitoring Indigenous peoples’ human rights as enshrined in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is a global, and in the case of post-TRC and post-MMIWG Inquiry Canada, a national imperative. Although this is now recognized as an international priority, governments and civil societies everywhere are struggling with the vexing question of how to do so. This international and intersectional research network responds to a pressing need for research and tools to assist, monitor, and share information to support implementation. Initiated by Indigenous researchers and organizations and predominantly comprised of Indigenous scholars, organizations and initiatives, this network will deliver research outcomes that are immediately relevant to Indigenous peoples. When shared through this network, research findings will have broad and immediate transnational governmental and societal impact. This network will also serve to rapidly share knowledge in formats that are accessible to experts, policy makers, the general public, and, especially, Indigenous peoples.

Complex Sovereignties: Theory and Practice of Indigenous Self-Determination in Settler States and the International System

Together with Professor David MacDonald of Guelph University, this SSHRC funded project examines assertive, creative and innovative practices of Indigenous self-determination in multi-national, cross-border, and global contexts. This research aims to inform both the theoretical development of self-determination and policy decisions, building on literature documenting the history of Indigenous diplomacy and trade. We explore distinct, but overlapping and complementary, forms of self-determining practice, including passports, independent trade or diplomatic missions, involvement in elements of state external sovereignty, treaty relations, territorial and economic self-determination, pooled sovereignty, global organizing beyond the state, and the rebuilding and assertion of nationhood.

The Politics of Indigenous Apologies

This SSHRC-funded project engages in a qualitative comparative case study analysis of state apologies to Indigenous peoples in five countries: Canada (2008), Australia (2008), the United States (2009), Norway (1997) and New Zealand (numerous and ongoing), including historic analysis to trace the way these apologies evolved over time as well as the after effects. The case studies explore the evolution of state decisions to offer apologies, the domestic political context and mode of delivery, as well as accompanying compensation and/or constitutional and policy changes, in comparative perspective.

Sheryl is also a co-applicant on Transformative Memory: Strengthening an International Partnership SSHRC Partnership Development Grant (2018-2021).


Publications

Books

Handbook of Indigenous Public Policy. Co-edited with Sarah Maddison. (Elgar, forthcoming).

Global Indigenous Politics: A Subtle Revolution. “Worlding Beyond the West” series. (Oxfordshire, UK: Routledge, 2016).

Journal Articles and Book Chapters

“The United Nations and both Foe and Friend to Indigenous Peoples and Self-Determination,” co-authored with David B. MacDonald. In The United Nations: Friend or Foe of Self-Determination?  Edited by Jakob R. Avgustin (Bristol, England, E-International Relations Publishing, 2020) 32-46.

“Conclusion.” Pathways of Reconciliation: Indigenous and Settler Approaches to Implementing the TRC’s Calls to Action. Edited by Aimee Craft and Paulette Regan (Winnipeg: University of Manitoba Press, 2020).

“First Nations and Canadian Defence.” In Canadian Defence Policy in Theory and Practice. Edited by Thomas Juneau, Philippe Lagassé and Srdjan Vucetic (Nature, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020) 217-232.

“The Pessimism Traps of Indigenous Resurgence.” In Pessimism in International Relations: Provocations, Possibilities, Politics. Edited by Tim Stevens and Nicholas Michelsen (Nature, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020) 155-172.

“Legislative Frameworks for Implementing the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.” In Braiding Legal Orders: Implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, edited by Oona Fitzgerald, John Borrows, Larry Chartrand, Risa Schwatrz (Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2019) 21-28.

“Hokkaidō 150: settler colonialism and Indigeneity in modern Japan and beyond,” co-authored with Tristan Grunow, Fuyubi Nakamura, Katsuya Hirano, Mai Ishihara, ann-elise lewallen, Mayunkiki, Danika Medak-Saltzman, Terri-Lynn Williams-Davidson & Tomoe Yahata. Critical Asian Studies 51 (2019): 597-636.

“Indigenous-Canadian Relations at the Sesquicentennial: An Opportunity for Real and Lasting Transformation,” in Policy Transformation in Canada: Is the Past Prologue? Edited by Carolyn Hughes Tuohy, Sophie Borwein, Peter Loewen and Andrew Potter (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2019) 124-131.

“Implementing the UN Declaration: The View from Canada” in Conversations about Indigenous Rights: The UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in Aotearoa New Zealand. Edited by Selwyn Katene and Rawiri Taonui (Massey University Press, New Zealand, 2018) 75-92.

“A Promise Too Far?: The Justin Trudeau Government and Indigenous Rights” in Canada Among Nations, eds. Norman Hillmer and Phillipe Lagasse (Palgrave MacMillan, 2018) 165-186.

“Treaty Relations between Indigenous Peoples: Advancing Global Understandings of Self-Determination,” co-authored with David MacDonald. New Diversities Special Issue “Indigenous Politics of Resistance: From Erasure to Recognition,” 19 (2017): 25-40.

“Adopting and Implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: Canada’s Existential Crisis” in Surviving Canada: Indigenous Peoples Celebrate 150 Years of Betrayal, edited by Kiera L. Ladner and Myra Tait (Winnipeg, MB: ARP, 2017) 440-459.

“Revealing, Reporting and Reflecting: Indigenous Studies Research as Praxis in Reconciliation Projects” in Sources and Methods in Indigenous Studies, edited by Chris Andersen and Jean O’Brien. (Oxfordshire, UK: Routledge, 2016) 297-304.

“Indigenous Mobilisation and Activism in the UN System,” in Routledge Handbook of Indigenous Peoples’ Rights, edited by Damien Short and Corinne Lennox (Oxfordshire, UK: Routledge, 2015), 253-267.

“Settler State Apologies to Indigenous Peoples: A Normative Framework and Comparative Assessment.” Native American and Indigenous Studies 2 (2015): 15-39.

“Marge Anderson: Restoring the Treaty Rights of the Mille Lacs Band,” in “Our Cause Will Ultimately Triumph” Profiles in American Indian Sovereignty, ed. Tim Alan Garrison (Durham, NC: Carolina Academic Press, 2014), 143-156.

“The International Indigenous Rights Discourse and its Demands for Multilevel Citizenship,” in Multilevel Citizenship, ed. Willem Maas (Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013), 127-146.

“Selective Endorsement without Intent to Implement: Indigenous Rights and the Anglosphere.” The International Journal of Human Rights 16 (2012): 100-122.

“Emerging Indigenous Rights Norms and ‘Over-Compliance’ in New Zealand and Canada.” Political Science 62 (2010): 84-104.

“Indigenous Rights in International Politics: The Case of ‘Over-Compliant’ Liberal States.” Alternatives: Global, Local, Political 33 (2008): 83-104.

Wilkins, David E. and Sheryl Lightfoot, “Oaths of Office in Tribal Constitutions: Swearing Allegiance, but to Whom?” American Indian Quarterly 32 (2008): 389-411.

Newspaper Op-Eds

“B.C Takes Historic Steps Towards the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, but the Hard Work is Yet to Come.” The Conversation Canada. November 13, 2019.

“The Road to Reconciliation Starts with the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.” The Conversation Canada. September 12, 2019.

“Yes, Canada is Guilty of Genocide. Now It’s Time to Act,” The Tyee. June 10, 2019. With David MacDonald.

“UNDRIP is Cause for Celebration, not Alarm.”  The Province. April 20, 2019. With Grand Chief Edward John.

“Legislative Framework Essential for UN Declaration.” Hill Times, January 10, 2018. With Paul Joffe.

“Reconciliation at 150 – Canada’s Great Challenge.” Vancouver Sun, August 17, 2017. With Jason Tockman.

“A Sea Change on the Declaration–or Is It?” Indian Country Today, May 3, 2010.

“Reconciling Moral Outrage with Self-Determination.” Indian Country Today, March 9, 2007.


Graduate Supervision

PhD

Alison James, Political Science

Gudrun Ros Arndottir, Political Science

Matthew Norris, Political Science

Katherine Walker (co-supervised with Barbara Arneil), Political Science

Rebecca Klady, (co-supervised with Stephen Sheppard), Forestry (2020)

Matthew Wildcat, Political Science (2020)

MA

Stacey Freeman, Political Science (2014)

Dominic Lai, Political Science (2016)

Matthew Norris, Political Science (2018)

Committees

Ketty Anyeko, PhD, Interdisciplinary Studies

Fumiya Nagai, PhD, Anthropology

Jose Arias, PhD, Forestry

Rachel George, PhD, Indigenous Governance, UVic

Karen Slakov, MA, Political Science (2017)

Zoe Ducklow, Master’s of Journalism (2017)

Dorothy Christian, PhD, Education Studies (2017)

Emi Sasagawa, Master’s of Journalism (2015)

Elise Sammons, MA, Political Science (2014)

Jason Tockman, PhD, Political Science (2014)

Shayna Plaut, PhD, Education Studies (2014)

Jose Arias, MA, Forestry (2013)


Sheryl Lightfoot

Associate Professor, SPPGA / Political Science
phone 604 827 0712
location_on Liu Institute 216B

Sheryl Lightfoot is Canada Research Chair of Global Indigenous Rights and Politics and Associate Professor, School of Public Policy and Global Affairs and the Department of Political Science at the University of British Columbia.

As one of the world’s experts in global Indigenous politics, Sheryl’s research specializes in complex questions of Indigenous peoples’ rights and how those rights are being claimed and negotiated in various political spaces. Her work explores both practical and theoretical aspects of implementation of Indigenous rights globally as well as in comparative domestic and regional contexts.

Sheryl also currently serves as Senior Advisor to the UBC President on Indigenous Affairs. Sheryl is Anishinaabe from the Lake Superior Band of Ojibwe, enrolled at the Keweenaw Bay Community in northern Michigan.

International Indigenous Rights and Governance Network

Implementing, assessing, and monitoring Indigenous peoples’ human rights as enshrined in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is a global, and in the case of post-TRC and post-MMIWG Inquiry Canada, a national imperative. Although this is now recognized as an international priority, governments and civil societies everywhere are struggling with the vexing question of how to do so. This international and intersectional research network responds to a pressing need for research and tools to assist, monitor, and share information to support implementation. Initiated by Indigenous researchers and organizations and predominantly comprised of Indigenous scholars, organizations and initiatives, this network will deliver research outcomes that are immediately relevant to Indigenous peoples. When shared through this network, research findings will have broad and immediate transnational governmental and societal impact. This network will also serve to rapidly share knowledge in formats that are accessible to experts, policy makers, the general public, and, especially, Indigenous peoples.

Complex Sovereignties: Theory and Practice of Indigenous Self-Determination in Settler States and the International System

Together with Professor David MacDonald of Guelph University, this SSHRC funded project examines assertive, creative and innovative practices of Indigenous self-determination in multi-national, cross-border, and global contexts. This research aims to inform both the theoretical development of self-determination and policy decisions, building on literature documenting the history of Indigenous diplomacy and trade. We explore distinct, but overlapping and complementary, forms of self-determining practice, including passports, independent trade or diplomatic missions, involvement in elements of state external sovereignty, treaty relations, territorial and economic self-determination, pooled sovereignty, global organizing beyond the state, and the rebuilding and assertion of nationhood.

The Politics of Indigenous Apologies

This SSHRC-funded project engages in a qualitative comparative case study analysis of state apologies to Indigenous peoples in five countries: Canada (2008), Australia (2008), the United States (2009), Norway (1997) and New Zealand (numerous and ongoing), including historic analysis to trace the way these apologies evolved over time as well as the after effects. The case studies explore the evolution of state decisions to offer apologies, the domestic political context and mode of delivery, as well as accompanying compensation and/or constitutional and policy changes, in comparative perspective.

Sheryl is also a co-applicant on Transformative Memory: Strengthening an International Partnership SSHRC Partnership Development Grant (2018-2021).

Books

Handbook of Indigenous Public Policy. Co-edited with Sarah Maddison. (Elgar, forthcoming).

Global Indigenous Politics: A Subtle Revolution. “Worlding Beyond the West” series. (Oxfordshire, UK: Routledge, 2016).

Journal Articles and Book Chapters

“The United Nations and both Foe and Friend to Indigenous Peoples and Self-Determination,” co-authored with David B. MacDonald. In The United Nations: Friend or Foe of Self-Determination?  Edited by Jakob R. Avgustin (Bristol, England, E-International Relations Publishing, 2020) 32-46.

“Conclusion.” Pathways of Reconciliation: Indigenous and Settler Approaches to Implementing the TRC’s Calls to Action. Edited by Aimee Craft and Paulette Regan (Winnipeg: University of Manitoba Press, 2020).

“First Nations and Canadian Defence.” In Canadian Defence Policy in Theory and Practice. Edited by Thomas Juneau, Philippe Lagassé and Srdjan Vucetic (Nature, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020) 217-232.

“The Pessimism Traps of Indigenous Resurgence.” In Pessimism in International Relations: Provocations, Possibilities, Politics. Edited by Tim Stevens and Nicholas Michelsen (Nature, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020) 155-172.

“Legislative Frameworks for Implementing the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.” In Braiding Legal Orders: Implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, edited by Oona Fitzgerald, John Borrows, Larry Chartrand, Risa Schwatrz (Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2019) 21-28.

“Hokkaidō 150: settler colonialism and Indigeneity in modern Japan and beyond,” co-authored with Tristan Grunow, Fuyubi Nakamura, Katsuya Hirano, Mai Ishihara, ann-elise lewallen, Mayunkiki, Danika Medak-Saltzman, Terri-Lynn Williams-Davidson & Tomoe Yahata. Critical Asian Studies 51 (2019): 597-636.

“Indigenous-Canadian Relations at the Sesquicentennial: An Opportunity for Real and Lasting Transformation,” in Policy Transformation in Canada: Is the Past Prologue? Edited by Carolyn Hughes Tuohy, Sophie Borwein, Peter Loewen and Andrew Potter (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2019) 124-131.

“Implementing the UN Declaration: The View from Canada” in Conversations about Indigenous Rights: The UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in Aotearoa New Zealand. Edited by Selwyn Katene and Rawiri Taonui (Massey University Press, New Zealand, 2018) 75-92.

“A Promise Too Far?: The Justin Trudeau Government and Indigenous Rights” in Canada Among Nations, eds. Norman Hillmer and Phillipe Lagasse (Palgrave MacMillan, 2018) 165-186.

“Treaty Relations between Indigenous Peoples: Advancing Global Understandings of Self-Determination,” co-authored with David MacDonald. New Diversities Special Issue "Indigenous Politics of Resistance: From Erasure to Recognition,” 19 (2017): 25-40.

“Adopting and Implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: Canada’s Existential Crisis” in Surviving Canada: Indigenous Peoples Celebrate 150 Years of Betrayal, edited by Kiera L. Ladner and Myra Tait (Winnipeg, MB: ARP, 2017) 440-459.

“Revealing, Reporting and Reflecting: Indigenous Studies Research as Praxis in Reconciliation Projects” in Sources and Methods in Indigenous Studies, edited by Chris Andersen and Jean O’Brien. (Oxfordshire, UK: Routledge, 2016) 297-304.

“Indigenous Mobilisation and Activism in the UN System,” in Routledge Handbook of Indigenous Peoples’ Rights, edited by Damien Short and Corinne Lennox (Oxfordshire, UK: Routledge, 2015), 253-267.

“Settler State Apologies to Indigenous Peoples: A Normative Framework and Comparative Assessment.” Native American and Indigenous Studies 2 (2015): 15-39.

"Marge Anderson: Restoring the Treaty Rights of the Mille Lacs Band," in “Our Cause Will Ultimately Triumph” Profiles in American Indian Sovereignty, ed. Tim Alan Garrison (Durham, NC: Carolina Academic Press, 2014), 143-156.

"The International Indigenous Rights Discourse and its Demands for Multilevel Citizenship," in Multilevel Citizenship, ed. Willem Maas (Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013), 127-146.

"Selective Endorsement without Intent to Implement: Indigenous Rights and the Anglosphere." The International Journal of Human Rights 16 (2012): 100-122.

"Emerging Indigenous Rights Norms and 'Over-Compliance' in New Zealand and Canada." Political Science 62 (2010): 84-104.

"Indigenous Rights in International Politics: The Case of 'Over-Compliant' Liberal States." Alternatives: Global, Local, Political 33 (2008): 83-104.

Wilkins, David E. and Sheryl Lightfoot, "Oaths of Office in Tribal Constitutions: Swearing Allegiance, but to Whom?” American Indian Quarterly 32 (2008): 389-411.

Newspaper Op-Eds

“B.C Takes Historic Steps Towards the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, but the Hard Work is Yet to Come.” The Conversation Canada. November 13, 2019.

“The Road to Reconciliation Starts with the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.” The Conversation Canada. September 12, 2019.

“Yes, Canada is Guilty of Genocide. Now It’s Time to Act,” The Tyee. June 10, 2019. With David MacDonald.

“UNDRIP is Cause for Celebration, not Alarm.”  The Province. April 20, 2019. With Grand Chief Edward John.

“Legislative Framework Essential for UN Declaration.” Hill Times, January 10, 2018. With Paul Joffe.

“Reconciliation at 150 – Canada’s Great Challenge.” Vancouver Sun, August 17, 2017. With Jason Tockman.

"A Sea Change on the Declaration--or Is It?" Indian Country Today, May 3, 2010.

"Reconciling Moral Outrage with Self-Determination." Indian Country Today, March 9, 2007.

PhD

Alison James, Political Science

Gudrun Ros Arndottir, Political Science

Matthew Norris, Political Science

Katherine Walker (co-supervised with Barbara Arneil), Political Science

Rebecca Klady, (co-supervised with Stephen Sheppard), Forestry (2020)

Matthew Wildcat, Political Science (2020)

MA

Stacey Freeman, Political Science (2014)

Dominic Lai, Political Science (2016)

Matthew Norris, Political Science (2018)

Committees

Ketty Anyeko, PhD, Interdisciplinary Studies

Fumiya Nagai, PhD, Anthropology

Jose Arias, PhD, Forestry

Rachel George, PhD, Indigenous Governance, UVic

Karen Slakov, MA, Political Science (2017)

Zoe Ducklow, Master’s of Journalism (2017)

Dorothy Christian, PhD, Education Studies (2017)

Emi Sasagawa, Master’s of Journalism (2015)

Elise Sammons, MA, Political Science (2014)

Jason Tockman, PhD, Political Science (2014)

Shayna Plaut, PhD, Education Studies (2014)

Jose Arias, MA, Forestry (2013)

Sheryl Lightfoot

Associate Professor, SPPGA / Political Science
phone 604 827 0712
location_on Liu Institute 216B

Sheryl Lightfoot is Canada Research Chair of Global Indigenous Rights and Politics and Associate Professor, School of Public Policy and Global Affairs and the Department of Political Science at the University of British Columbia.

As one of the world’s experts in global Indigenous politics, Sheryl’s research specializes in complex questions of Indigenous peoples’ rights and how those rights are being claimed and negotiated in various political spaces. Her work explores both practical and theoretical aspects of implementation of Indigenous rights globally as well as in comparative domestic and regional contexts.

Sheryl also currently serves as Senior Advisor to the UBC President on Indigenous Affairs. Sheryl is Anishinaabe from the Lake Superior Band of Ojibwe, enrolled at the Keweenaw Bay Community in northern Michigan.

International Indigenous Rights and Governance Network

Implementing, assessing, and monitoring Indigenous peoples’ human rights as enshrined in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is a global, and in the case of post-TRC and post-MMIWG Inquiry Canada, a national imperative. Although this is now recognized as an international priority, governments and civil societies everywhere are struggling with the vexing question of how to do so. This international and intersectional research network responds to a pressing need for research and tools to assist, monitor, and share information to support implementation. Initiated by Indigenous researchers and organizations and predominantly comprised of Indigenous scholars, organizations and initiatives, this network will deliver research outcomes that are immediately relevant to Indigenous peoples. When shared through this network, research findings will have broad and immediate transnational governmental and societal impact. This network will also serve to rapidly share knowledge in formats that are accessible to experts, policy makers, the general public, and, especially, Indigenous peoples.

Complex Sovereignties: Theory and Practice of Indigenous Self-Determination in Settler States and the International System

Together with Professor David MacDonald of Guelph University, this SSHRC funded project examines assertive, creative and innovative practices of Indigenous self-determination in multi-national, cross-border, and global contexts. This research aims to inform both the theoretical development of self-determination and policy decisions, building on literature documenting the history of Indigenous diplomacy and trade. We explore distinct, but overlapping and complementary, forms of self-determining practice, including passports, independent trade or diplomatic missions, involvement in elements of state external sovereignty, treaty relations, territorial and economic self-determination, pooled sovereignty, global organizing beyond the state, and the rebuilding and assertion of nationhood.

The Politics of Indigenous Apologies

This SSHRC-funded project engages in a qualitative comparative case study analysis of state apologies to Indigenous peoples in five countries: Canada (2008), Australia (2008), the United States (2009), Norway (1997) and New Zealand (numerous and ongoing), including historic analysis to trace the way these apologies evolved over time as well as the after effects. The case studies explore the evolution of state decisions to offer apologies, the domestic political context and mode of delivery, as well as accompanying compensation and/or constitutional and policy changes, in comparative perspective.

Sheryl is also a co-applicant on Transformative Memory: Strengthening an International Partnership SSHRC Partnership Development Grant (2018-2021).

Books

Handbook of Indigenous Public Policy. Co-edited with Sarah Maddison. (Elgar, forthcoming).

Global Indigenous Politics: A Subtle Revolution. “Worlding Beyond the West” series. (Oxfordshire, UK: Routledge, 2016).

Journal Articles and Book Chapters

“The United Nations and both Foe and Friend to Indigenous Peoples and Self-Determination,” co-authored with David B. MacDonald. In The United Nations: Friend or Foe of Self-Determination?  Edited by Jakob R. Avgustin (Bristol, England, E-International Relations Publishing, 2020) 32-46.

“Conclusion.” Pathways of Reconciliation: Indigenous and Settler Approaches to Implementing the TRC’s Calls to Action. Edited by Aimee Craft and Paulette Regan (Winnipeg: University of Manitoba Press, 2020).

“First Nations and Canadian Defence.” In Canadian Defence Policy in Theory and Practice. Edited by Thomas Juneau, Philippe Lagassé and Srdjan Vucetic (Nature, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020) 217-232.

“The Pessimism Traps of Indigenous Resurgence.” In Pessimism in International Relations: Provocations, Possibilities, Politics. Edited by Tim Stevens and Nicholas Michelsen (Nature, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020) 155-172.

“Legislative Frameworks for Implementing the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.” In Braiding Legal Orders: Implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, edited by Oona Fitzgerald, John Borrows, Larry Chartrand, Risa Schwatrz (Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2019) 21-28.

“Hokkaidō 150: settler colonialism and Indigeneity in modern Japan and beyond,” co-authored with Tristan Grunow, Fuyubi Nakamura, Katsuya Hirano, Mai Ishihara, ann-elise lewallen, Mayunkiki, Danika Medak-Saltzman, Terri-Lynn Williams-Davidson & Tomoe Yahata. Critical Asian Studies 51 (2019): 597-636.

“Indigenous-Canadian Relations at the Sesquicentennial: An Opportunity for Real and Lasting Transformation,” in Policy Transformation in Canada: Is the Past Prologue? Edited by Carolyn Hughes Tuohy, Sophie Borwein, Peter Loewen and Andrew Potter (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2019) 124-131.

“Implementing the UN Declaration: The View from Canada” in Conversations about Indigenous Rights: The UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in Aotearoa New Zealand. Edited by Selwyn Katene and Rawiri Taonui (Massey University Press, New Zealand, 2018) 75-92.

“A Promise Too Far?: The Justin Trudeau Government and Indigenous Rights” in Canada Among Nations, eds. Norman Hillmer and Phillipe Lagasse (Palgrave MacMillan, 2018) 165-186.

“Treaty Relations between Indigenous Peoples: Advancing Global Understandings of Self-Determination,” co-authored with David MacDonald. New Diversities Special Issue "Indigenous Politics of Resistance: From Erasure to Recognition,” 19 (2017): 25-40.

“Adopting and Implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: Canada’s Existential Crisis” in Surviving Canada: Indigenous Peoples Celebrate 150 Years of Betrayal, edited by Kiera L. Ladner and Myra Tait (Winnipeg, MB: ARP, 2017) 440-459.

“Revealing, Reporting and Reflecting: Indigenous Studies Research as Praxis in Reconciliation Projects” in Sources and Methods in Indigenous Studies, edited by Chris Andersen and Jean O’Brien. (Oxfordshire, UK: Routledge, 2016) 297-304.

“Indigenous Mobilisation and Activism in the UN System,” in Routledge Handbook of Indigenous Peoples’ Rights, edited by Damien Short and Corinne Lennox (Oxfordshire, UK: Routledge, 2015), 253-267.

“Settler State Apologies to Indigenous Peoples: A Normative Framework and Comparative Assessment.” Native American and Indigenous Studies 2 (2015): 15-39.

"Marge Anderson: Restoring the Treaty Rights of the Mille Lacs Band," in “Our Cause Will Ultimately Triumph” Profiles in American Indian Sovereignty, ed. Tim Alan Garrison (Durham, NC: Carolina Academic Press, 2014), 143-156.

"The International Indigenous Rights Discourse and its Demands for Multilevel Citizenship," in Multilevel Citizenship, ed. Willem Maas (Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013), 127-146.

"Selective Endorsement without Intent to Implement: Indigenous Rights and the Anglosphere." The International Journal of Human Rights 16 (2012): 100-122.

"Emerging Indigenous Rights Norms and 'Over-Compliance' in New Zealand and Canada." Political Science 62 (2010): 84-104.

"Indigenous Rights in International Politics: The Case of 'Over-Compliant' Liberal States." Alternatives: Global, Local, Political 33 (2008): 83-104.

Wilkins, David E. and Sheryl Lightfoot, "Oaths of Office in Tribal Constitutions: Swearing Allegiance, but to Whom?” American Indian Quarterly 32 (2008): 389-411.

Newspaper Op-Eds

“B.C Takes Historic Steps Towards the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, but the Hard Work is Yet to Come.” The Conversation Canada. November 13, 2019.

“The Road to Reconciliation Starts with the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.” The Conversation Canada. September 12, 2019.

“Yes, Canada is Guilty of Genocide. Now It’s Time to Act,” The Tyee. June 10, 2019. With David MacDonald.

“UNDRIP is Cause for Celebration, not Alarm.”  The Province. April 20, 2019. With Grand Chief Edward John.

“Legislative Framework Essential for UN Declaration.” Hill Times, January 10, 2018. With Paul Joffe.

“Reconciliation at 150 – Canada’s Great Challenge.” Vancouver Sun, August 17, 2017. With Jason Tockman.

"A Sea Change on the Declaration--or Is It?" Indian Country Today, May 3, 2010.

"Reconciling Moral Outrage with Self-Determination." Indian Country Today, March 9, 2007.

PhD

Alison James, Political Science

Gudrun Ros Arndottir, Political Science

Matthew Norris, Political Science

Katherine Walker (co-supervised with Barbara Arneil), Political Science

Rebecca Klady, (co-supervised with Stephen Sheppard), Forestry (2020)

Matthew Wildcat, Political Science (2020)

MA

Stacey Freeman, Political Science (2014)

Dominic Lai, Political Science (2016)

Matthew Norris, Political Science (2018)

Committees

Ketty Anyeko, PhD, Interdisciplinary Studies

Fumiya Nagai, PhD, Anthropology

Jose Arias, PhD, Forestry

Rachel George, PhD, Indigenous Governance, UVic

Karen Slakov, MA, Political Science (2017)

Zoe Ducklow, Master’s of Journalism (2017)

Dorothy Christian, PhD, Education Studies (2017)

Emi Sasagawa, Master’s of Journalism (2015)

Elise Sammons, MA, Political Science (2014)

Jason Tockman, PhD, Political Science (2014)

Shayna Plaut, PhD, Education Studies (2014)

Jose Arias, MA, Forestry (2013)